Thursday, July 20, 2017

July 20 - Ludwig's Turning In His Grave

It's back to work on the east wall of the barn now that the cement has had plenty of time to set and harden.  It's hard to tell from this pic because the tractor is in the way, but they've started framing in the new wall.
There was nothing really picture worthy to report yesterday because they'd mainly just been cleaning up the pile of debris that had accumulated in that interior corner to the left, where the boards are now laid out.  They've broken two hammers, lost another hammer, and lost a pry bar so far in this project.  lol

Yesterday was a so-so day at work.  My mood wasn't quite so dramatic.  Today, my day off, was pretty mellow.  I had no plans, no place to be, no one here to bother me, and I loved it.  I puttered on small little things that needed to be done, played with the kitties, watched some murder shows on TV, did some stamping and coloring.  When things slowed down or when I sat at the computer too long my dark mood started to creep back in, so I had to talk myself into getting up and getting busy on something else again.  Overall though, a pretty good day of finding some inner peace, at least for the moment.

I finished reading my Ludwig book last night and posted my review this morning.  I finished watching that Neuschwanstein DVD today.  While it was really cool to see all the castle stuff, there were some things that made me feel sick to my stomach, made me feel so bad for Ludwig.  Let me explain.  His castles were meant to be his private sanctuaries.  They were not for prying eyes or guests or conducting business.  During the standoff at Neuschwanstein that final night, he told his last few loyal people to keep those rooms private, like his final plea.  And yes, we all know that Neuschwanstein was opened to the public within months of his death and that it is now one of the biggest tourist attractions in Europe.  I've been there myself!  But to see on the DVD just how many people go there, and how packed the courtyard is with people milling about, and the different lines for guided tours set up according to language . . . I seriously almost wanted to cry for poor Ludwig!  I think it said thousands of people tour the castle each day.  Each tour group has 65 people at a time and lasts about 35 minutes.  Some people have complained they feel rushed when they take the tour, but I suppose it's so they can keep groups moving through.  I think it would have been a tiny bit better if the staging areas for the tours wasn't *in the courtyard*.  If they'd have the gates and turnstiles and overhanging signs and things outside the actual castle, maybe it wouldn't seem quite so disrespectful.

Another thing on the DVD was a little news story about one of the tour guides.  He said he'd lived for five years at the castle and I was like "Whaaat?!"  Apparently his father had been a tour guide there for many years and had actually lived at the castle!  In some rooms in the gatehouse, or gardener's house on the grounds or something?!  Now this guy was a tour guide and lived there.  Gah!  Again, disrespectful!  Poor poor, Ludwig.  I must admit though, it was neat to see this guy's story because it showed him cleaning things in the castle, getting ready for another day of work.  It was neat to see things besides the usual rooms and views that you usually see when they show anything about Neuschwanstein.  He was also talking about how almost all of the people that visit the castle know nothing of its history or of Ludwig, they just come because it's a tourist site.  He said the rare person that comes through that is knowledgeable about it and asks questions, he always stops and chats with them.  That was kinda cool, but still . . . poor Ludwig!!!!

Anyway, I'm not sure what to read now.  I really want to go back and read the second book I'd read about him again, but I also want to get to some other stuff that has been gathering dust here.  I'm pretty sure my mind would be distracted though so I'll probably just grab that Ludwig book.

And I'm totally nattering here.

Tomorrow I'll have a little craft haul.

What are you reading?


4 comments:

  1. Ha! It you'd REALLY like to see some items that would make King Ludwig truly mad, go to Amazon and enter 'King Ludwig' under 'All'. Towards the end, you'll find paraphernalia bearing an identical photo of King Ludwig's crypt!Puzzles, t shirts, coasters and beer caddies!!

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    1. Ugh! One of the little video clips on the DVD I got was showing the gift shop at the end of the tour, and all the disgustingly cheesy items it offers. One of the women who worked in the shop was pointing out what items different nationalities tend to buy. I think she said Americans are fond of mugs (steins) and I was like 'Doh!' cuz yes, we bought some there! LOL

      (The Japanese buy little spoons, and the Spanish buy shot glasses. Interesting.)

      ~Deb

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  2. Poor guy! He had such a troubled life, I hope he's finding some peace in death. I didn't realize there was controversy about his death, whether it was suicide or murder. I loved your recap of the conversation with Johan!

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    1. It was the mystery of his death that sucked me into learning more about him. After we'd visited the castle and were back at the house of the people we were staying with, an older gentleman was talking about the mystery and I was like 'Wait, what?' Not sure why it took me so many more years to finally read more about it though.

      Yes, I hope he's at peace. Sad as it is, I think I lean towards the suicide theory. :(

      ~Deb

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